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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MERIT BADGE

 

 

Consider working on the Landscape Architecture Merit Badge ALONG WITH the Architecture Merit Badge as Scouts earn two merit badges at the same time and many of the requirements are shared.  You may also want to consider looking into the Gardening Merit Badge BEFORE or ALONG WITH the Landscape Architecture Merit Badge.

If you like the Landscape Architecture Merit Badge, consider also doing Architecture, Drafting, Gardening, Plant Science, and Surveying.

 

Scoutmaster Bucky offered this merit badge:

Saturday May 23, 2015

Minneapolis, MN

 

8 Scouts

Saturday March 10, 2012

Maple Plain, MN

 

11 Scouts

Saturday March 12, 2011

Richfield, MN

 

10 Scouts

Saturday March 6, 2010

Richfield, MN

 

11 Scouts

Saturday March 14, 2009

Richfield, MN

 

10 Scouts

 

 

 

Created:

1967

 

 

Scoutmaster Bucky Class Prep Page:

click here

 

 

Scoutmaster Bucky Workbook:

click here

 

 

Landscape Architecture Merit Badge History Page:

click here

 

 
 

 

 

MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS

source: Boy Scout Requirements, 2015 Edition

 

1. Go to a completed landscape project that a landscape architect has designed.  Before you visit the site, obtain a plan of the design from the landscape architect if one is available.

 

2. After completing requirement 1, discuss the following with your merit badge counselor:

a. Tell whether the design had separate spaces, a clear path system, and sun and shade variety.

b. Discuss how the designated seating, eating, or parking areas suited the overall design.

c. Explain how the design reflected consideration for the comfort, shelter, and security of the users.

d. Discuss how the choice of trees, shrubs, and ground covers used in the project contributed to its appeal and function.

 

3. Identify five shrubs, five trees, and one ground cover, being sure that you select examples of different shapes, sizes, and textures.  With the help of your counselor or a local nursery, choose plants that will grow in your area.  Bring pictures of the different planting materials or, if possible, examples of their branches, leaves, or flowers to a group such as your troop or class at school.  Be prepared to tell how you might use each in the design of a landscape.

 

4. Look at and study a place of worship or school grounds to find the place where most people arrive by bus or car. Show you can do the following:

a. Using a measuring tape, measure and draw the entry and its nearby area using a scale of 1/8 inch equals 1 foot on an 11-by-17-inch piece of paper. Be sure to include the driveway and the wall and door where people enter the school or place of worship. Indicate any sidewalks, structures, trees, and plants within the study area. Make two copies of this plan to save the original, then do 4b and 4c using the copies.

b. On one copy, use directional arrows to indicate where the water drains across the site, where ditches occur, and where water stands for a longer period of time.

c. Decide how you can make the place safer and more comfortable for those using it. Redesign the area on another copy of the plan. You may want to include new walks, covered waiting areas, benches, space-defining plantings of trees and shrubs, and drainage structures.

 

5. Find out about three career opportunities in landscape architecture.  Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession.  Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

 

this page last reviewed and updated - December 2015